Volume 3, Issue 3, September 2017, Page: 45-51
Determinants of Institutional Delivery Among Mothers Who Gave Birth in the Last One Year in Dejen Woreda, Ethiopia, 2016: A Cross Sectional Study
Melaku Desta, Department of Midwifery, College of Health Science, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
Temesgen Getaneh, Department of Midwifery, College of Health Science, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
Tebikew Yeneabat, Department of Midwifery, College of Health Science, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
Yewbmirt Sharew, Department of Midwifery, College of Health Science, Debre Markos University, Debre Markos, Ethiopia
Mulugeta Animaw, Midwifery Health professionals, Southern Nations and Nationalities Hospital, Hawasa, Ethiopia
Haymanot Tsegaw, Midwifery Health professionals, Southern Nations and Nationalities Hospital, Hawasa, Ethiopia
Received: Aug. 14, 2017;       Accepted: Aug. 31, 2017;       Published: Oct. 23, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.jfmhc.20170303.11      View  1927      Downloads  56
Abstract
Background: Globally maternal mortality remained a public health challenge. Institutional delivery ensures safe birth which reduces maternal mortality and morbidity. This study aimed to assess determinants of institutional delivery among mothers who gave birth in the last one year. Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted during May 16 to 28, 2016 in Dejen woreda. Multistage sampling technique was used for selection of 361 participants and collected data were entered and analyzed using Statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 20. Multiple logistic regression was employed to identify factors associated with the institutional delivery at p-value <0.05` and to control the confounders. Results: Institutional delivery service utilization was 71.7%. Educational status, age and residence of the mother, having antenatal care visit/frequency of ANC visit, gravidity and husband's preference were independent predictors of institutional delivery service utilization. Conclusion and recommendation: Many women gave birth at health institution in Dejen Woreda. Younger age, having secondary and above educational status and urban residents, having 4 or above ANC visit, primiparaous and husband's preferred health facility had significantly associated with increased institutional delivery. Empowering women, ensuring all women to receive ANC visit according to the recommended number of visit, improving the quality of information on skilled delivery and enhancing partner’s involvement, as well as increasing accessibility of health facilities in the rural areas, could increase institutional delivery service utilization.
Keywords
Institutional Delivery, Determinants, Dejen Woreda
To cite this article
Melaku Desta, Temesgen Getaneh, Tebikew Yeneabat, Yewbmirt Sharew, Mulugeta Animaw, Haymanot Tsegaw, Determinants of Institutional Delivery Among Mothers Who Gave Birth in the Last One Year in Dejen Woreda, Ethiopia, 2016: A Cross Sectional Study, Journal of Family Medicine and Health Care. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2017, pp. 45-51. doi: 10.11648/j.jfmhc.20170303.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
United Nations Children’s fund (UNICEF). Progress for children. Airport on maternal mortality: 2008.
[2]
WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, World Bank, the United Nations Population Division. Trends in maternal mortality 1990 to 2013. Geneva: 2014.
[3]
Central Statistical Agency Ethiopia and ICF International: Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey 2011: Addis Ababa. Ethiopia and Calverton, Maryland, USA: Central Statistical Agency and ICF International; 2012.
[4]
Abera M, Belachew T. Predictors of safe delivery service utilization in Arsi Zone, South-East Ethiopia. Ethiopian journal of health sciences. 2011; 21 (3).
[5]
USAID: Population Reference Bureau: Making pregnancy and child birth safer. USA: Policy brief; http//:www.measurecommunication.org 07:01:2016.
[6]
Hogan MC, Foreman KJ, Naghavi M, Ahn SY, Wang M, Makela SM, et al. Maternal mortality for 181 countries, 1980 2008: a systematic analysis of progress towards MDG5. Lancet 2010; 375:160923.
[7]
Ahmed A: Maternal Mortality Trend in Ethiopia. Ethiop J Health Dev 2010, 24(1):117–120.
[8]
FMOH, UNICEF, UNFPA, WHO and AMDD: National Baseline Assessment for Emergency Obstetric & Newborn Care in Ethiopia. 2008: 18.
[9]
United Nations: MGDs Report; New York; 2008; 24-25.
[10]
Prata N, Passano P, Rowen T, Bell S, Walsh J and Potts M: Where There Are (Few) Skilled Birth Attendants. Journal of health nutrition, population and Nutrition. 2011 April; 29(2): 81–91.
[11]
Tabatabaie MG, Moudi Z, Vedadhir A. Home birth and barriers to referring women with obstetric complications to hospitals: a mixed-methods study in Zahedan, southeastern Iran. Reproductive health. 2012; 9(1):5.
[12]
Baral Y, Lyons K, Skinner J, Van Teijlingen E. Determinants of skilled birth attendants for delivery in Nepal. Kathmandu University Medical Journal. 2012;8(3):325-32.
[13]
Shrestha SK, Banu B, Khanom K, Ali L, Thapa N, Stray-Pedersen B, et al. Changing trends on the place of delivery: why do Nepali women give birth at home? Reproductive health. 2012; 9(1):25.
[14]
Exavery et al.: Access to institutional delivery care and reasons for home delivery in three districts of Tanzania. International Journal for Equity in Health 2014 13:48.
[15]
Hassan Ali Ibrahim et al.: Predictors of Utilization of Skilled Birth Attendants Among Women of Reproductive Age in Mandera East Sub County, Mandera County, Kenya, Science SPG Journal of Public Health 2017; 5(3): 230-239.
[16]
Awuni Prosper Mandela Amaltinga et al.: An Assessment of Factors Influencing Access to Skilled Delivery in the Sunyani West District in the Brong Ahafo Region of Ghana, SPG Public Health International 2017; 2(3): 102-110.
[17]
Federal Democratic republic of Ethiopia/Ministry of Finance and Economic Development. Trends and prospect for meeting MDGs by 2015. 2010. Addis Ababa.
[18]
Teferra A, Alemu F, Woldeyohannes S. Institutional delivery service utilization and associated factors among mothers who gave birth in the last 12 months in Sekela District, North West of Ethiopia: A community-based cross sectional study. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2012; 12(1):74.
[19]
Awoke W, Muhammed J, Abeje G. Institutional delivery service utilization in Woldia, Ethiopia. Science. 2013;1(1):18-23.
[20]
Fikre AA, Demissie M. Prevalence of institutional delivery and associated factors in Dodota woreda (district), Oromia regional state, Ethiopia. Reproductive health. 2012; 9 (1):33.
[21]
Tsegay Y, Gebrehiwot T, Goicolea I, Edin K, Lemma H, Sebastian MS, et al. Determinants of antenatal and delivery care utilization in Tigray region, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study. International journal for equity in health. 2011;10: 15.
[22]
Andemariyam Yohannes et al.: Magnitude of Safe Delivery Services Utilization and Associated Factors Among Women of Childbearing Age in Egela Sub-Woreda, Tigray, Northern Ethiopia, Science publishing group Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics 2016; 4(6): 44-52.
[23]
Amano A, Gebeyehu A, Birhanu Z. Institutional delivery service utilization in Munisa Woreda, South East Ethiopia: a community based cross-sectional study. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2012; 12(1):105.
[24]
Kaleb Mayisso Rodamo et al: Magnitude and Determinants of Utilization of Skilled Birth Attendance among Women of Child Bearing Age in Sidama Zone, Southeast Ethiopia: Science Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2015; 3(4): 69-76.
Browse journals by subject